Andrew Wetzel's Musings

March 25, 2019

Data Integrity: How Accurate is/ was your Property Listing?

Filed under: Buying,Ethics,Hiring an agent,Marketing,Price,Selling,Technology — awetzel @ 5:42 PM

What is “data integrity”?  It means that the data we collect, store and report is accurate.  What do I mean by data?  It could be the status of a property listing (is it available to see and buy? Has it been put under contract?  Has it settled?), the price, the type of property and its features.  I want to relate the importance of accurate data to three different groups of people, all part of a sale.

Let’s start with buyers.  A seller needs a “ready, willing and able” buyer to complete a sale.  Whether a buyer hires an agent to search the MLS or they search online, the expectation is that properties matching what the buyer is looking for will appear in their search results so they can evaluate whether to take the next step or they will not know a house is even available to consider.  If they cannot find it in their search results, they will not see it and they will not buy it.  Even worse, a listing agent may not know there is a fixable error and ask the seller for what may be an unnecessary price reduction which reduces their proceeds and still not make it any easier to find the property in search results.  I have many examples and will share two.

  • Early in my career a buyer identified two possible elementary schools for her daughters to attend. She drove the neighborhood and found a “For Sale” sign on a house, called me for information about the house and asked me to search the area for homes like the one she was fortunate to find.  I found several other houses for the family to consider but the one she saw was not in my search results.  The listing agent had entered the wrong zip code.  Imagine if she had not seen the yard sign and the house had remained on the market unsold.  She would have missed seeing the house they bought and the sellers may have been asked to lower their price.  By the way, the family is in the same house many years later;
  • A frustrated seller called me. His property had been on the market recently and his listing contract expired without a sale.  He called me to see what I could suggest.  I looked up the property, discussed it with him and quickly found a major error:  the MLS showed the house as having a single bathroom.  He said it had two full baths.  People searching for two full baths did not know his house was available even after he reduced his asking price.  This is sad and avoidable.

In addition to limiting the number of available houses for buyers to consider, which could lead to a buyer not seeing their best options, errors will affect a market analysis.  Buyers usually want to know what comparable houses have been selling for before they make an offer.  Houses that are not accurately listed as well as those whose statuses are not correct could impact a buyer’s perception of what to offer, perhaps causing them to lose a sale.

Similarly, a seller looking to price their house according to its location, features and condition may be relying on incorrect or incomplete information.  Their house could sit on the market unsold or they could accept less than they should have.  Over the years I have seen a number of houses not properly reported as being sold.  Instead, the listing contract expired or the agent withdrew it from the market making it look like the property did not sell which is often interpreted as meaning that the price was too high.

The last person this misinformation can impact is the appraiser.  They evaluate selling prices based on reported comparable sales.  They can only rely on what is reported even if it is inaccurate (how would they know?).  In addition to the status, appraisers rely on pictures, features and the public remarks to try to identify the prior sales most like the house they are appraising.  What is the cost of inaccurate information?  If it falsely appears that a buyer paid too much, the process may stop unless the seller lowers their asking price OR the buyer comes up with more money OR they somehow work it out.  Mortgages are based on a percentage of the appraised value so errors matter.

To conclude, data integrity is a BIG deal.  Many of my seller clients were unsuccessful with one or more agents before we met.  Many of their property listings contained at least one error and there were often errors serious enough to prevent a sale.  In many cases I was able to improve their chances simply by adjusting the marketing to enable potential buyers and their agents to actually find their property in their search results.  It is like a “Google search”:  how many inaccurate entries do you see before getting the result you were looking for?  You may give up or never find the best answer for your search.

Today many buyers start their searches on the Internet before contacting an agent which only magnifies the potential damage as they may not be as proficient identifying listings as a professional is.  People rely on our training and our experience which is why a higher percentage of consumers use our services than ever before.  I do not mean this to sound like a commercial but this is what we do.

Of course there are times when price may still be an issue especially if the length of time on the market needlessly scares buyers into thinking there is something wrong with a house.  Either way, a seller should not have to suffer a financial loss because their agent failed to do their job.  In  addition, many of my clients say that they never saw their MLS sheet with a prior agent or searched online to see how their property information looked, if it was even there.  Some said that their agent never gave them a copy of their printout and that may be true as I suspect that many know they have not generated a good listing printout.  Many listing printouts, in addition to being incomplete as far as features, lack pictures or offer only a few bad ones, some taken with cell phones, and have no public remarks section or have a poorly written remarks section that is boring, incomplete or loaded with bad spelling and poor grammar making them hard to read.

The MLS syndicates the information on your listing printout to the major search engines we all know as well as thousands of others.  If the MLS is not done well this only magnifies the problem:  “garbage in; garbage out”.  Your printout is literally like a resume.  So, unless your house is on a well-traveled street exposing your “For Sale” sign to lots of traffic, the MLS and Internet may be the only ways anyone will know you want to sell.  Does that make you feel comfortable?  What is the cost of delaying your plans or being asked to accept less money than you should?  What does your printout look like?

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations! 

Remember:  HIRE WISELY!  We are not all the same!

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