Andrew Wetzel's Musings

May 15, 2021

All Offers Must Be Received By … and Will Be Presented on ….

The type of Real Estate market produces some creative ways to “protect and promote” the interest of our clients.  The ebb and flow of who has “power” and “leverage” is interesting.  What may work (or frustrate others) in one market may appear insane in another.  That being said, we are required and expected to respect different “business models”.  However, do we have to do as we are told?

Many listing agents use a “Presentation of Offers” form which spells out what they want included in a purchase offer and how they conduct business.  I respect different “business models” and think the concept makes sense but I am left wondering about some of what they expect.  As long as the seller agrees that is fine but some of what I see seems counter-productive.  Here are a few examples:

  • An agent must submit an offer before being allowed to show a property;
  • A buyer must perform inspections before submitting an offer;
  • Do not have any contingency expire on a weekend or holiday.  If you do, add language to the agreement stating that the time frame is extended to the next “business day”. What exactly is a “holiday” anyway?;
  • Offers received after 5pm will be presented to the seller the next morning;
  • Offers received after 5pm on Friday will be presented to the seller on Monday;
  • Offers are to be submitted at a “specified time” and will be reviewed at a “specified time”.

Respectfully, if a seller agrees with any of these or other terms, perhaps that is their wish and their choice, that is fine but some of these make me wonder.  Real Estate is not a 9-5 job although it should not be 24/7 either.  I guess it all comes down to the type of market.  The question is:  do we have to comply?

We are in the hottest seller’s market I have seen in years.  Every house seems flooded with showings and multiple offers which, combined with the pandemic, many sellers and buyers are finding very frustrating.  To accelerate what I refer to as the “second step” to selling or buying Real Estate, the “third step” being when an offer is negotiated, some listing agents are doing one of two things to generate immediate interest.  They start showings at an “open house” or use a “Coming Soon” strategy to make buyers salivate before they can legally get in.  Both can work but may be creating a frenzy that will not play out as expected.  Some buyers are making offers “sight unseen”, waiving inspections and/ or going well over asking price, all in an effort to beat real or perceived “competition”.  Some agents just make their listings “active” and let the fun begin.  Th market will change.  It always does.

Some agents take this a step further and advertise when offers are due and when they will be presented to the seller.  These are bold steps that must be managed.  I find it interesting when a property listing expires unsold or a contract gets canceled and the listing agent neglected to remove language stating that offers were due and would be presented weeks or months ago.  OOPS!

Let’s suppose I activate a listing on Friday, state that offers are due by Monday at 3pm and will be presented to the seller at 7pm.  Pick any days of the week or time frames you prefer.  What happens next?  Compliant buyers and their agents will honor the listing agent’s instructions assuming they will be followed.  But will they?  Suppose they aren’t?  Some agents will try to submit offers after 3pm.  Does the listing agent say NO?  Is that buyer or agent penalized for being late?  Suppose the buyer agent has difficulty reaching the listing agent to say they have an offer or has trouble getting it to them?  We do so much electronically these days so that should not be a problem but it can be if there are Internet or equipment issues.

Suppose I have a buyer who does not like competition, may have lost out on one or more other houses they really wanted to own or they just want a quick answer so they can pursue other options before they sell?  What should I do?  I would submit an offer as soon as I can and, if my buyer is willing, we can make it expire prior to the 7pm deadline.  Listing agents are required to submit all offers in a timely manner.  While it is possible that their seller has said not to present anything before Monday at 7pm, if I were the listing agent I would let my sellers know that I had something, especially if it is compelling.  Suppose the seller says they want to accept the offer that came in early?

Buyers and their agents who were in the process of meeting the 3pm deadline have every right to be upset but did the listing agent do anything wrong?  Suppose a seller signs an offer before an “open house”?  At the very least, if my seller decided to sign an offer earlier than we advertised, I would let agents know what happened to be transparent and fair.  I would not want to waste their time and effort.  You never know, something could happen with the accepted offer and we may need to resume showings.  Perhaps a buyer is willing to provide a back-up offer.

Multiple offers are common these days which sounds nice but explaining them, evaluating their differences, responding to them and selecting the “winner” can be more complicated than it seems.  Are they taken at “face value”, which means that no one is provided an opportunity for a “second chance”, or are all or some “negotiated”?  What happens if they only “entertain” a few of them?  Even with multiple offers there is no guarantee that a seller will get what they want but they might learn the market’s perception of value.  Sellers determine the price but buyers determine the value.

What happens when the “sight unseen” buyer finally sees inside or the buyer who waived inspections questions the condition of the property or what the seller disclosed?  What happens when the appraiser files their report?  The “creativity” that secured a signed purchase agreement does not guarantee a deed transfer.  Real Estate is like 3-dimensional chess compared to a basic retail transaction where I pay you and I get my purchased item right away.  Real Estate provides “delayed gratification”:  every day until settlement may offer an unpleasant surprise.  It is never over until the seller has the buyer’s money and the buyer has the seller’s keys.

Even in “normal” markets, which generally means 3-6 months of available inventory, depending on what you believe, things can get contentious.  While we generally “cooperate” with each other, this is a competitive industry.  Only one buyer gets the house.  Buying or selling Real Estate are emotional decisions justified with logic.  Putting in the time and effort to buy or sell Real Estate requires commitment and exposing yourself to potential frustration.  They are not things most people do every day.  What one person thinks is creative can have quite a different reaction from someone else.

REALTORS have to manage expectations.  We need to explain the process of buying or selling to our clients.  We have done this before.  The consumer has 24/7 access to endless amounts of data and information, including television shows, but it takes an experienced, trained and educated professional to add two secret ingredients:  knowledge and insight.

When it comes to buying or selling what is likely your largest asset and biggest investment,

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations.

HIRE WISELY:  We are not all the same!

April 5, 2021

My New Audio Course is LIVE on Listenable.io

I received an email from the staff at Listenable.  They provide an online platform that offers “powerful, bite-sized audio courses authored by well‑loved experts”.  They said:  “Congratulations on launching your first course on Listenable!  We’re excited to have you on board!  We sincerely appreciate the work you’ve done to create such an outstanding course and we are proud to have you on the Listenable team.”

I am happy and excited to add my content to their impressive lineup of courses.  The title of my course is “The Basics of Selling Residential Real Estate”.  Why did I create it?

My passion for Real Estate led to my writing blogs and recording podcasts.  Someone at Listenable heard my podcasts and contacted me to ask if I would be interested in creating an audio course for them.  The subject matter was up to me and this topic seemed an obvious choice.

As I have learned over the course of my career as well as through my involvement in various roles within the Real Estate community, Real Estate is not rocket science by any means although many make it far more complicated than necessary.  The process of selling or buying residential Real Estate generally involves a number of basic steps that must be completed in order to succeed.  Hiring a professional should increase your chances for success.  Our experience, training and education can provide the knowledge and insight typically needed to navigate the home selling or buying process.

My course consists of 13 lessons averaging about 8 minutes each.  I break the steps of selling Real Estate down into “the basics” and explain what we do and why we do it.  My goal is to take some of the mystery out of what people think we do and clarify it so that the typical listener will be more comfortable with the process.  I discuss the entire selling process from hiring an agent through settlement/ closing.  I hope that you will listen to it and recommend my course to people you know.

Here are the lessons:  The “Five Steps to Selling Real Estate”; Hiring an Agent; Preparing Your House for Sale; Marketing Your House to Sell; Pricing Your House to Sell; The Listing Contract; Your House is on the “Active” Market; Congratulations, You Have an Offer; Contingencies; Closing the Sale.  I included two “bonus” lessons:  Andrew’s Time-Tested Real Estate One Liners and The Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS.

Here is a direct link:  https://listenable.io/web/courses/380/the-basics-of-selling-residential-real-estate/   To enjoy14 free days of Listenable, use this link:  https://listenable.io/?rf=CMO1BEOO

I have an extensive catalog of blogs and podcasts posted on several websites including my primary site AndrewWetzel.com.  If you haven’t followed them, I encourage you to give them a try.  If you have read and listened to my material, thank you.  I will keep adding new content.

Best wishes and thank you for listening and reading!  As always, I am a phone call, email or text away if you have any questions.

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations.

HIRE WISELY:  We are not all the same.

January 2, 2021

Bright MLS November 2020 Residential Housing Report

Showing Time, using Bright MLS statistics, has released their Local Market Insight report for single family homes in Delaware County Pennsylvania through November 2020.  If you would like information about this or any other County or any specific municipalities in the Delaware Valley, please contact me or visit my web site, AndrewWetzel.com.  I am only a text, email or phone call away!  I respond promptly to all inquiries.

The overall market continues to be affected by the pandemic and resulting economic impact.  However, generally speaking, the results in many areas are encouraging and, as always, your experience may differ depending on your location and how you have been personally impacted.  As I always say, the decision to buy or sell Real Estate is a personal one and the current environment typifies that.

The report compares current year-to-date results to one-year ago, same time period.  As with all Real Estate statistics, two things are true.  First, the performance within individual zip-codes can and will vary significantly from the overall County.  Real Estate is local and results can vary from neighborhood to neighborhood and even block to block.  There is no such thing as a “national” Real Estate market any more than there is a national weather forecast so, whether you may be thinking about selling or buying, please contact me for details about your areas of interest.  I can provide current information and keep you informed about the evolving market.  Deciding whether it is the right time to sell or buy is a personal decision typically involving a number of variables.  I can provide the knowledge and insight to help you decide what works for you.

My second point is that, unfortunately, all Real Estate statistics involving sold data are stale.  This is especially true if you are relying on Internet valuation models which use recorded data rather than up-to-date MLS information.  Even then, while a sale may be reported as settled or closed today, the real question is when was the offer negotiated?  Typically, sales can take 45 to 60 days to close so the market today may be different from when the offer was presented and negotiated.  Up-to-date information, even if not perfect, is important!

As far as the statistics, there were 7911 units listed for sale through November 2020 compared to 8661 listed through November 2019, a decrease of 8.7%.  Low inventory levels are the cause of related data points.  There were 6379 closed sales through November 2020 compared to 6381 through November 2019, a negligible decrease.  The median selling price through November 2020 was $252,000 compared to $226,000 through November 2019, an increase of 10.6%.  The large decrease in properties being listed had a relatively small effect on the number sold while substantially increasing their selling prices.  The number of currently available properties is well below one year ago and the Days on the Market (DOM) and “Sold to List Price” ratio are much improved.  Do we have an inventory problem or pent-up demand?  Again, these numbers vary throughout the County:  the underlying data shows a wide range of results in all categories among the 49 different municipalities in Delaware County.

Generally speaking, low inventory levels in some areas have produced multiple offers and a frenzy among buyers, some of whom may live to regret a hasty decision to get a property under contract.  During the shutdown when “in-person” Real Estate activity was not permitted, many buyers made offers “sight unseen”, some without inspections to improve their odds.  The effects of that remain to be seen but Real Estate, perhaps with the exception of those properties acquired strictly as “investments” with documented income, is generally not something given its expense and complexity that the typical buyer would want to purchase without an in-person showing let alone removing the protection of an inspection contingency.  Technology, however advanced, has its limitations.

What about the properties that did not sellMany came off the market and remain unavailable.  As the pandemic has evolved, some properties did come back on the market but many have not.  Did owners delay, change or give up their plans?  Buying activity has been strong but the sellers may be reluctant to allow showings or may have issues they are dealing with.  My only concern is whether people are making an informed decision or reacting to what they “think” is happening in the market.

Buyers and sellers need to do the same planning and preparation that those tasks typically require.   Anyone looking to sell or buy needs to understand their local market and decide how to react to the pandemic as a “variable” that was not here last year and, hopefully, will be gone in the near future.  However, the effects of buying and selling remain for years.  They are important decisions and likely require the knowledge and insight that a professional can provide.

I tell my clients that I cannot guarantee that their house will sell if it is on the market but am fairly certain that it won’t if they take it off the market.  Anyone trying to sell now may have less competition and more offers to consider.  Buyers may have more competition and fewer houses to consider.  Hiring an experienced, trained and educated professional is more important than ever.

Despite the pandemic, every house will not sell.  Houses may get showings without generating offers unless buyers think they are priced within the range of their perceived “worth”.  Most property listings whose contracts are canceled or allowed to expire have asking prices considered high for their market and/ or they were poorly marketed, meaning that some buyers and agents may not have even known that a house was available to look at or purchase.  Some buyers may even make “full price” offers just to control the process only to have remorse later as inspection results are revealed. Of course this may well depend on the ratio of buyer and sellers so there is more to this than raw statistics.

If a market has a lot of inventory, some buyers may not be willing to look at houses priced high compared to the rest of the market:  why try to negotiate a price down when other similar properties are available at more competitive prices?  Many sellers open to negotiating their price will never get the chance.  I will be happy to discuss specifics with you.

The overall economy is coming back but many are still hurting financially.  Statistics aside, what are you planning to do?  Real Estate is generally a long-term investment unless you are looking to fix and flip it or planning to move within a short period of time.  There are opportunities out there.  As with the stock market, it is very difficult to pick the best time to make a move.  All you can do is get the best available information, determine what is in your best interests and then start the process.  I am a phone call or email away and getting started is easy once you take action.

If you want or need to sell any type of Real Estate, now or in the future, whether you tried and did not succeed before or are planning for the first time, it is never too early to start the planning and preparation.  Please do not wait for what you think is a better or the best time to start.  Buyers look all year long and can only see and buy properties that are available to see.  Based on what we experienced in 2020, is waiting for Spring something you would consider?

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations! 

HIRE WISELY:  We are not all the same!

November 28, 2020

Delaware County PA October 2020 Residential Housing Report

Bright MLS has released their Residential Market Statistics (which they call Local Market Insight) for single family homes in Delaware County Pennsylvania through October 2020.  If you would like information about this or any other County or any specific municipalities in the Delaware Valley, please contact me.  I am only a text, email or phone call away!  I respond promptly to all inquiries.

The overall market continues to be affected by the pandemic and resulting economic impact.  However, generally speaking, the results in many areas are encouraging and, as always, your experience may differ depending on your location and how you have been personally impacted.  As I always say, the decision to buy or sell Real Estate is a personal one and the current environment typifies that.

The report compares current year-to-date results to one-year ago, same time period.  As with all Real Estate statistics, two things are true.  First, the performance within individual zip-codes can and will vary significantly from the overall County.  Real Estate is local and results can vary from neighborhood to neighborhood and even block to block.  There is no such thing as a “national” Real Estate market any more than there is a national weather forecast so, whether you may be thinking about selling or buying, please contact me for details about your areas of interest.  I can provide current information and keep you informed about the evolving market.  Deciding whether it is the right time to sell or buy is a personal decision typically involving a number of variables.  I can provide the knowledge and insight to help you decide what works for you.

My second point is that, unfortunately, all Real Estate statistics involving sold data is stale.  This is especially true if you are relying on Internet valuation models which use recorded data rather than up-to-date MLS information.  Even then, while a sale may be reported as settled or closed today, the real question is when was the offer negotiated?  Typically, sales can take 45 to 60 days to close so the market today may be different.  Up-to-date information, even if not perfect, is important!

As far as the statistics, there were 7282 units listed for sale through October 2020 compared to 8133 listed through October 2019, a decrease of over 10%.  Low inventory levels are the cause of related data points.  There were 5684 closed sales through October 2020 compared to 5879 through October 2019, a decrease of over 3%.  The median selling price through October 2020 was $250,000 compared to $227,500 through October 2019, an increase of almost 10%.  The large decrease in properties being listed had a relatively small effect on the number sold while substantially increasing their selling prices.  Again, these numbers vary throughout the County:  the underlying data shows a wide range of results in all categories among the 49 different municipalities in Delaware County.

Generally speaking, low inventory levels in some areas have produced multiple offers and a frenzy among buyers, some of whom may live to regret a hasty decision to get a property under contract.  During the shutdown when “in-person” Real Estate activity was not permitted, many buyers made offers “sight unseen”, some without inspections to improve their odds.  The effects of that remain to be seen but Real Estate, perhaps with the exception of those acquired strictly as “investments” with documented income, is generally not something given its expense and complexity that the typical buyer would want to purchase without an in-person showing let alone removing the protection of an inspection contingency.  Technology, however advanced, has its limitations.

What about the properties that did not sellMany came off the market and remain unavailable.  As the pandemic has evolved, some properties did come back on the market but many have not.  Did owners delay, change or give up their plans?  Buying activity has been strong but the sellers may be reluctant to allow showings or may have issues they are dealing with.  My only concern is whether people are making an informed decision or reacting to what they “think” is happening in the market.

For example, I recently sat on an Auxiliary Tax Assessment Appeal panel and heard almost 1000 appeals by people generally questioning whether their proposed assessed value is realistic or not.  While I understand their concern about how the new assessments based on July 2019 market values will affect next year’s tax bills, many are saying that the pandemic has lowered selling prices which is a debatable statement.  Whether true or not is easily demonstrated but, regardless, the new assessed values are based on July 2019 long  before the current pandemic was known.

Buyers and sellers need to do the same planning and preparation that those tasks typically require.   Anyone looking to sell or buy needs to understand their local market and decide how to react to the pandemic as a “variable” that was not here last year and, hopefully, will be gone in the near future.  However, the effects of buying and selling remain for years.  They are important decisions and likely require the knowledge and insight that a professional can provide.

I tell my clients that I cannot guarantee that their house will sell if it is on the market but am fairly certain that it won’t if they take it off the market.  Anyone trying to sell now may have less competition and more offers to consider.  Buyers may have more competition and fewer houses to consider.  Hiring an experienced, trained and educated professional is more important than ever.

Despite the pandemic, every house will not sell.  Houses may get showings without generating offers unless buyers think they are priced within the range of their perceived “worth”.  Most property listings whose contracts are canceled or allowed to expire have asking prices considered high for their market and/ or they were poorly marketed, meaning that some buyers and agents may not have even known that a house was available to look at or purchase.  Some buyers may even make “full price” offers just to control the process only to have remorse later as inspection results are revealed. Of course this may well depend on the ratio of buyer and sellers so there is more to this than raw statistics.

If a market has a lot of inventory, some buyers may not be willing to look at houses priced high compared to the rest of the market:  why try to negotiate a price down when other similar properties are available at more competitive prices?  Many sellers open to negotiating their price will never get the chance.  I will be happy to discuss specifics with you.

The overall economy is coming back but many are still hurting financially.  Statistics aside, what are you planning to do?  Real Estate is generally a long-term investment unless you are looking to fix and flip it or planning to move within a short period of time.  There are opportunities out there.  As with the stock market, it is very difficult to pick the best time to make a move.  All you can do is get the best available information, determine what is in your best interests and then start the process.  I am a phone call or email away and getting started is easy once you take action.

If you want or need to sell any type of Real Estate, now or in the future, whether you tried and did not succeed before or are planning for the first time, it is never too early to start the planning and preparation.  Please do not wait for what you think is a better or the best time to start.  Buyers look all year long and can only see and buy properties that are available to see.  Based on what we experienced this year, is waiting for Spring something you would consider?

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations! 

HIRE WISELY:  We are not all the same!

October 3, 2020

Delaware County PA August 2020 Local Real Estate Market Insight

Bright MLS has released their Local Market Insight statistics for single family homes in Delaware County Pennsylvania through August 2020.  If you would like more detailed information about this or any other County or any specific municipalities in the Delaware Valley, please contact me.  I am only a text, email or phone call away!  I respond promptly to all inquiries.

The overall market continues to be affected by the pandemic and resulting economic impact.  However, generally speaking, the results in many areas are encouraging and, as always, your experience may differ depending on your location and how you have been personally impacted.  As I always say, the decision to buy or sell Real Estate is a personal one and the current environment typifies that.

The report compares current year-to-date results to one-year ago, same time period.  As with all Real Estate statistics, two things are true.  First, the performance within individual zip-codes can and will vary significantly from the overall County.  Real Estate is local and results can vary from neighborhood to neighborhood and even block to block.  There is no such thing as a “national” Real Estate market any more than there is a national weather forecast so, if you are thinking about selling or buying, please contact me for details about your areas of interest.  I can provide current information and keep you informed about the evolving market.  Deciding whether it is the right time to sell or buy is a personal decision typically involving a number of variables.  I can provide the knowledge and insight to help you decide what works for you.

My second point is that, unfortunately, all Real Estate statistics involving sold data are stale.  This is especially true if you are relying on Internet valuation models which use recorded data rather than up-to-date MLS information.  Even then, while a sale may be reported as settled or closed today, the real question is when was the offer negotiated?  Typically, sales take 45 to 60 days to close so the market today may be different.  Up-to-date information, even if not perfect, is important!

As far as the statistics, there were 5533 units listed for sale through August 2020 compared to 6532 listed through August 2019, a decrease of 15.3%.  Low inventory levels can have a major impact on the Real Estate market, depending on how many buyers are competing.  There were 4141 closed sales through August 2020 compared to 4682 through August 2019, a decrease of 11.6%.  Compare units listed to closed sales and it is obvious that many houses did not sell.  The median selling price through August 2020 was $249,900 compared to $234,000 through August 2019, an increase of 6.8%.  Interestingly enough, statistics just for August 2020 are much improved over August 2019, suggesting that the spring market was delayed and not completely lost.  Again, these numbers vary throughout the County:  the underlying data shows a wide range of results in all categories among the 49 different municipalities in Delaware County.

Generally speaking, low inventory levels in some areas have produced multiple offers and a frenzy among buyers, some of whom may live to regret a hasty decision to get a property under contract.  I still see people who regret decisions they made or did not make during the last boom.  During the shutdown when “in-person” Real Estate activity was not permitted, many buyers made offers “sight unseen” or without inspections.  The effects of that remain to be seen but Real Estate, perhaps with the exception of properties acquired strictly as “investments” with documented income, is generally not something given its expense and complexity that the typical buyer would want to purchase without an in-person showing and inspections.  Technology, however advanced, has its limitations.

What about the properties that did not sellMany came off the market and still remain unavailable.  As the pandemic has evolved, some properties did come back on the market but many have not.  Did owners delay, change or give up their plans?  Buying activity has been strong but the sellers may be reluctant to allow showings or may have other issues they are dealing with.  My main concern is whether people are making an informed decision or reacting to what they “think” is happening in the market.  As always, some opinions are just that.

For example, I am sitting on the Auxiliary Property Reassessment Appeal panel in Delaware County and to date have heard well over 400 appeals by owners questioning whether the new assessed value assigned to their property is realistic or not.  While I understand the concern about how the new values based on July 2019 market values will affect next year’s tax bills, many are saying that the pandemic has lowered selling prices which is a very debatable statement.  Whether true or not is easily demonstrated but, regardless, the new assessed values are based on July 2019 long before the current pandemic was known.  If 2020 numbers were used, many would see even higher numbers.

Buyers need to do the same planning and preparation that buying always requires.  Selling involves the same planning and preparation as in the past.  Anyone looking to sell or buy just needs to understand their local market and decide how to react to the pandemic as a “variable” that was not here last year and, hopefully, will be gone in the near future.  The reassessment has another dimension of uncertainty.  As always, the effects of buying and selling remain for years.

I tell my clients that I cannot guarantee that their house will sell if it is on the market but am fairly certain that it won’t if they take it off the market.  Anyone trying to sell now may have less competition and more offers to consider.  Buyers may have more competition and fewer houses to consider.  Hiring an experienced, trained and educated professional is more important than ever.

Despite the pandemic, every house will not sell.  Houses may get showings without generating offers unless buyers think they are priced within the range of their perceived “worth”.  Most property listings whose contracts are canceled or allowed to expire have asking prices considered high for their market and/ or they were poorly marketed, meaning that some buyers and agents may not have even known that a property was available to look at or purchase.  I have created a new blog and podcast on that very subject based on two very recent experiences, one with a seller and the other with a buyer.  Some buyers may even make “full price” offers just to control the process only to have remorse later as inspection results are revealed. Of course this may well depend on the ratio of buyer and sellers so there is more to this than raw statistics.

If a market has a lot of inventory, some buyers may not be willing to look at houses priced high compared to the rest of the market:  why try to negotiate a price down when other similar properties are available at more competitive prices?  Many sellers open to negotiating their price will never get the chance.  I will happy to discuss specifics with you.

The overall economy is coming back but many are still hurting financially.  Statistics aside, what are you planning to do?  Real Estate is generally a long-term investment unless you are looking to fix and flip it or planning to move within a short period of time.  There are opportunities out there.  As with the stock market, it is very difficult to pick the best time to make a move.  An educated consumer faces better odds than a lucky one!  All you can do is get the best available information, determine what is in your best interests and then start the process.  I am a phone call or email away and getting started is easy once you take action.

If you want or need to sell any type of Real Estate, now or in the future, whether you tried and did not succeed before or are doing it for the first time, it is never too early to start the planning and preparation.  Please do not wait for what you think is a better or the best time to start.  Buyers look all year long and can only see and buy properties that are available to see.

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations! 

HIRE WISELY:  We are not all the same!

December 14, 2019

51 Things a Buyer’s Agent Should NOT Do, Even If Their Client Accepts Them

Real Estate agents are licensed by the state.  I am in Pennsylvania.  Once approved to represent or “work for” clients, they are bound by RELRA, our Real Estate Licensing and Registration Act, which is enforced by the state Real Estate Commission.  If an agent becomes a REALTOR, which means they belong to national, state and local REALTOR Associations, they are bound by a Code of Ethics which is very similar to RELRA although enforcement is handled through a local Association in most cases.

Once a REALTOR is “hired” to represent a buyer-client they owe them certain “fiduciary duties” which are spelled out in the rules and regulations.  They should review and discuss them with their buyer-client to ensure that they are committed to working together.  Here is a list of things NOT to do even if the buyer-client asks you to do them or if they accept your doing them.  Most of this list comes from real-life examples, fortunately not my own.  I have been mediating buyer-seller and client-agent disputes since 2002.  In addition, I have served on all levels of our Association’s Professional Standards Committee which means I have heard, reviewed, evaluated and resolved many ethics complaints.  As I like to say when I teach ethics to my fellow agents, you can’t make this stuff up.

Here are some examples of what NOT to do when representing a client buying Real Estate:

  • Do not ask how they found you or if they have spoken to or worked with any other agents;
  • Do not ask if they have seen or know of any specific properties that interest them;
  • Do not ask how they may have learned about any specific properties that interest them;
  • Do not spend a lot of time preparing for the initial conversation. Personality wins every time;
  • Do not explain the buying process, your respective “roles” and how you earn your fee;
  • Do not tell them what you are going to do for them and why they should hire you;
  • Do not discuss the overall market and how it is performing, specifically in areas they like;
  • Do not discuss how using the Internet for “shopping” may distract them;
  • Do not ask if they are financially pre-qualified to buy or discuss what a seller may expect or require before responding to an offer;
  • Do not recommend a proven, local lender. Let them use any lender they want without question;
  • Do not explain different financing alternatives or what a “seller assist” is;
  • Do not clarify what the buyer is looking for in terms of their “wants” and “needs”;
  • Do not ask if they own any Real Estate or if they have a property to sell;
  • Do not ask about their current living situation, their sense of urgency or their timeframe;
  • Do not ask if they know anyone else interested in buying or selling Real Estate;
  • Do not discuss how pricing correlates with location, features, condition and their competition;
  • Do not review the Consumer Notice with them or ask them to sign it. In fact, do not discuss or document your “business relationship” with them or explain your “fiduciary duties” to them.  If “dual agency” becomes a possibility, you can always discuss it later;
  • Assume you know what is best for them and let them assume you know what you are doing;
  • Do not sign a representation contract, explain your fee, how you are paid or that a seller typically pays your fee. If something comes up, you will figure it out later;
  • If you have no exclusive contract or if you have a “non-exclusive” contract, hope they want to see properties where the listing broker will pay you what you think you are “worth”;
  • Do not tell them that the length or term of the contract and your fee are negotiable by law;
  • Do not explain how the “protection period” works if you use one;
  • Do not tell them to call you about any property that may interest them or that they find on their own such as any with a “For Sale” or “Coming Soon” sign or any properties they find online;
  • Do not explain how “cooperation” with other Real Estate agents works or that you can show them any property in the MLS;
  • Do not discuss what may cause them to owe you money;
  • Do not trust the buyer to be able to determine the best areas for them to consider. Assume you know what is best and tell them what to do.  What could possibly go wrong?;
  • Do not suggest having them drive by properties first to evaluate the neighborhood and whatever else may impact their buying decision before taking the time to see inside;
  • Do not review MLS printouts or call listing agents to make sure that properties meet their needs and expectations;
  • Do not discuss scheduling showings or tell them that getting a confirmation may take time;
  • Do not explain the Agreement of Sale to them. In fact, make sure all paperwork is done electronically so you can save them time by not having to meet with you in person;
  • Do not discuss what may happen between the time an offer is presented to a listing agent and when it is signed or what typically happens before settlement;
  • Do not ask a listing agent if a property is still available before showing it;
  • Do not ask a listing agent if they have any other offers or interest or have turned anything down;
  • Do not ask a listing agent if the seller has any requirements such as a preferred settlement date;
  • Do not discuss a potential “range of values” for an offering price or discuss negotiating;
  • Do not discuss a strategy for making a competitive offer or for competing with other buyers;
  • Do not discuss what personal property is or could be included, excluded or negotiable;
  • Do not review the disclosure statements before asking them to initial and sign them,
  • Do not explain the contingencies in the Agreement of Sale, especially the inspections, or what could possibly go wrong;
  • Do not stay on top of the timeframes in the Agreement of Sale or provide ongoing updates;
  • Do not discuss any concerns that a seller, an inspector or an appraiser might have which could affect the buying process and possibly end it unsuccessfully;
  • Do not offer to attend inspections. Let the inspectors manage the buyer’s concerns;
  • Do not explain the mediation clause or what it means should a problem arise;
  • Do not discuss a home warranty or offer them an opportunity to include one with a sale;
  • Do not document changes to any contracts or provide them with copies of everything they sign;
  • Do not explain how deposit money is handled if a sale falls through;
  • Do not discuss what may happen if they fail to do what is required to complete a sale;
  • Do not promote or protect their interests above yours. Assume that “confidentiality” is not important if it gets in your way.  The acronym, OLD CAR, which describes our “fiduciary duties”, only makes you remember the first car you owned;
  • Do not let them make all of the decisions. Why bother them when you know what is best?;
  • Do not suggest they contact a professional, such as a lawyer, when they have a question;
  • Do not stay in touch after a sale! They will remember the spectacular service you provided!

Of course, this list is really intended to show you most of what we are expected to do, even if actual performance may vary from one agent to another.  Our “fiduciary duties” require that we obey your lawful instructions, be loyal to you, disclose what we know, keep your business confidential, account for any monies we handle and that we provide reasonable care and due diligence to you.  There is so much more to working for buyer and sellers than simply doing the paperwork.  Even if you have bought or sold Real Estate before, we have knowledge and insight gained through experience, training and education.  We are expected to protect and promote your interests throughout the process and to be knowledgeable and competent in what we do.  Our clients have the right to expect nothing less.

When it comes to buying what is typically a person’s largest asset:

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations!

HIRE WISELY:  We are not all the same!

November 15, 2019

49 Things a Listing Agent Should NOT Do, Even If Their Client Accepts Them

Real Estate agents are licensed by the state.  I am in Pennsylvania.  Once approved to represent or “work for” clients, they are bound by RELRA, our Real Estate Licensing and Registration Act, which is enforced by the state Real Estate Commission.  If an agent becomes a REALTOR, which means they belong to national, state and local REALTOR Associations, they are bound by a Code of Ethics which is very similar to RELRA although enforcement is handled through a local Association in most cases.

Once a REALTOR is “hired” to represent a seller-client they owe them certain “fiduciary duties” which are spelled out in the rules and regulations.  They should review and discuss them with their seller-client to ensure that they are committed to working together.  Here is a list of things NOT to do even if the seller-client asks you to do them or if they accept your doing them.  Most of this list comes from real-life examples, fortunately not my own.  I have been mediating seller-buyer and client-agent disputes since 2002.  In addition, I have served on all levels of our Association’s Professional Standards Committee which means I have heard, reviewed, evaluated and resolved many ethics complaints.  As I like to say when I teach ethics to my fellow agents, you can’t make this stuff up.

Here are some examples of what NOT to do when representing an owner selling Real Estate:

  • Do not ask if they are working with another agent or if they have spoken to any other agents;
  • Do not look in the MLS to see their property history or if they own other properties you think you might help them sell. Trust that they own any properties you are discussing;
  • Do not spend a lot of time preparing for the listing conversation. Personality wins every time;
  • Do not clarify what the seller is looking for in terms of their “wants” and “needs”;
  • Do not ask their reason for selling or ask if you can help them identify their next home;
  • If they are planning to buy another property, do not discuss getting them pre-qualified;
  • Do not ask if they know of anyone who has expressed interest in buying their property;
  • Do not ask if they know anyone else looking to sell or buy;
  • Do not ask if the seller can pay off any liens so that they can transfer ownership;
  • Do not explain the selling process, your respective “roles”, your fee and how you earn it;
  • Do not discuss how pricing correlates with location, features, condition and their competition;
  • Do not tell them what you are going to do for them or why they should hire you;
  • Do not review the Consumer Notice with them or ask them to sign it. In fact, do not discuss or document your “business relationship” with them or explain your “fiduciary duties” to them.  If “dual agency” becomes a possibility, you can always discuss it later;
  • Assume you know what is best for them and let them assume you know what you are doing;
  • Do not discuss their local market or a potential “range of values” for an asking or selling price;
  • Do not discuss their potential proceeds or their cost of selling. You can always do that later;
  • Do not ask them to repair or update anything even if you think a buyer, an inspector, an appraiser or a local codes enforcement officer might require repairs later. Everyone likes surprises, don’t they?;
  • Do not discuss how you will market their property;
  • Do not discuss what their options are if the market does not respond favorably to their property;
  • Do not discuss any personal property they may want to include, exclude or make negotiable;
  • Do not explain different financing alternatives, the appraisal process or what a “seller assist” is;
  • Do not sign a listing contract, if at all, until they are ready for showings. If something comes up, you can always figure it out later;
  • Do not tell them that the length or term of the contract and your fee are negotiable by law;
  • Do not explain how “cooperation” with other Real Estate agents works or how your fee can be used to help attract showings and offers. In fact, do not offer a market-driven coop fee or spend too much time preparing the MLS entry as you may really want to sell the property yourself;
  • Do not discuss how your fee is earned or what may happen if they fail to do what is required to complete a sale;
  • Do not explain how the “protection period” works;
  • Do not discuss scheduling showings and how important they are or tell them that some agents arrive late without rescheduling or fail to show up at all;
  • Do not tell them that “feedback” is old-fashioned and that most agents will not respond when asked;
  • Do not use an appointment center: make buyer agents call you for showings and then do not return their calls promptly.  Perhaps make sure their buyers are “qualified” to save time;
  • Do not explain how deposit money is handled if a sale falls through;
  • Do not discuss how you will handle inquiries about “other interest”, the existence of other offers or how you will handle inquiries and offers after a purchase agreement has been signed;
  • Do not discuss the law regarding the property and lead disclosures and do not review them before you upload them to the MLS. Perhaps you will not upload them until agents call you to request them;
  • Do not discuss home warranties or offer sellers an opportunity to include one with a sale;
  • Do not tell them that they cannot refuse to sell to people who aren’t like them;
  • Do not offer advice for preparing their home for sale and for showings;
  • Do not show them a copy of their MLS printout. Do you really need good pictures or a “remarks” section for buyers to evaluate the property?  Do you really need to show all of the features?;
  • Do not explain the Agreement of Sale to them. If fact, make sure all of the paperwork is done electronically so that you can save them time by not having to meet with you in person;
  • Do not discuss a negotiating strategy, especially if you have “multiple offers”, or ask what is important for them when comparing offers;
  • Do not discuss what may happen from the time an offer is signed through settlement;
  • Do not explain the contingencies in the Agreement of Sale, especially the inspections and municipal requirements, if any, or what could possibly go wrong;
  • Do not ask the buyer’s agent to attend inspections and be accountable for providing access;
  • Do not stay on top of the timeframes in the Agreement of Sale or provide ongoing updates;
  • Do not explain the mediation clause or what it means should a problem arise;
  • Do not tell them to maintain property insurance until a sale is completed;
  • Do not discuss any concerns that a buyer, an inspector or an appraiser might have which could affect the selling price or the seller’s proceeds and possibly end the sale unsuccessfully;
  • Do not document changes to any contracts or provide them with copies of everything they sign;
  • Do not promote or protect their interests above yours. Assume that “confidentiality” is not important if it gets in your way.  The acronym, OLD CAR, which describes our “fiduciary duties”, only makes you remember the first car you ever owned;
  • Do not suggest they contact a professional, such as a lawyer, when they have any questions;
  • Do not stay in touch after a sale! After all, they will remember your spectacular performance, won’t they?

Of course, this list is really intended to show you most of what we are expected to do, even if actual performance may vary from one agent to another.  Our “fiduciary duties” require that we obey your lawful instructions, be loyal to you, disclose what we know, keep your business confidential, account for any monies we handle and that we provide reasonable care and due diligence to you.  There is so much more to working for sellers and buyers than simply doing the paperwork.  Even if you have sold or bought Real Estate before, we have knowledge and insight gained through experience, training and education.  We are expected to protect and promote your interests throughout the process and to be knowledgeable and competent in what we do.  Our clients have the right to expect nothing less.

When it comes to selling what is typically a person’s largest asset:

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations!

HIRE WISELY:  We are not all the same!

March 25, 2019

How Sellers Sell Real Estate: Who is the Typical Seller?

Today I want to discuss the 2018 NAR or National Association of REALTORS Profile of Buyers and Sellers.  The report comes from a survey using 129 questions mailed to over 155,000 home buyers who purchased a primary residence between July 2017 and June 2018.  7191 were returned.  The focus of this podcast will be buyers who sold one home to buy another.  This was a national survey so your market may be quite different.  Real Estate is local:  there is no national Real Estate market so please contact me for information about your local market.

  • NAR has been collecting seller data since 1985 when the typical owner remained in their home for a median time of 5 years. In 2018 that number was 9 years which suggests that buyers may want to think long-term about their investment.  What appears to be a solid investment today may look different later.  Unfortunately, I still see sellers who paid more for their house than it is worth today and that can delay being able to sell it;
  • Sellers between the ages of 18-34 typically sold within 4 years while those over 75 sold after 17 years;
  • The median selling price was 99% of the final asking price. If you are an owner whose house is not attracting serious interest, meaning offers, this is important to know.  Many buyers think they are better at negotiating than they really are and are hesitant to start with their “best offer”.  In a very competitive situation they may not get a second chance.  On the other hand, a buyer may prefer to make an offer on a house closer to its market value to avoid having an appraisal issue or risk losing their second choice to another buyer when their offer on a house expires.  Whether a listing agent should disclose the existence of other offers is debatable but this should only be done when a seller allows it.  In some markets and with some buyers, competition may be welcome.  In others, not so much.  Sellers may also think themselves better at negotiation than they really are so they need good advice from a trusted and respected representative.  Ego can be a terrible thing to overcome.  Last point, showings are nice but they do not guarantee a sale;
  • 13% of houses purchased sold for more than asking price with 26% achieving the asking price and 24% selling for 95% or less than asking price;
  • The typical seller was 55 years old;
  • 68% were repeat sellers while 32% were selling for the first time;
  • 70% who purchased another home stayed in the same state; 16% moved to another region; 14% stayed in the same region but a different state;
  • 44% bought larger homes; 29% bought a similar size; 27% down-sized. The age of the seller strongly correlates with these statistics;
  • 50% bought a newer home than they sold; 28% bought one the same age; 22% bought an older home;
  • 47% spent more than their selling price; 27% spent less;
  • The most common reason for selling was that the house was too small (15%), followed by moving closer to friends and family (14%) and job relocation (13%);
  • 29% of first-time sellers cited size as being too small whereas repeat sellers cited moving closer to friends and family (17%). Selling is an expensive proposition so having to move in the short term because you outgrew a house or simply needed more space can be costly;
  • 91% of all sellers used a Real Estate agent with only 7% being a FSBO. 91% is the highest result recorded despite the presence of the Internet.  The % of FSBOs has steadily declined since 2000 even though the Internet was thought to have helped with exposure;
  • The median selling time for all sellers was 3 weeks. There is a correlation between the % of the final asking price achieved and the length of time it takes to sell.  While it can be a distracting obsession, many buyers look at the “days on the market” as an indicator of a home’s desirability and may avoid homes that are simply over-priced although they have no issues.  Houses that sold within 2 weeks or less achieved 100% of the final asking price whereas houses on the market for 17 weeks or more achieved only 94%.  Keep in mind that many houses are reduced in price to attract attention so looking at the final asking price as compared to the selling price is only one part of the story.  Sellers determine the asking price but buyers determine the value.  If nothing else, easy access to the Internet has allowed buyers to competitively shop meaning they at least know what is on the market although relying on valuation algorithms is risky.  Houses tend to get the most activity within a week or two of hitting the market.  Once the current supply of buyers knows a house is for sale and no one buys it, something has to energize and existing buyer or other buyers have to start their search;
  • 44% of sellers used buyer incentives to attract interest. The top two were home warranties and closing cost assistance.  These are not guaranteed to get the job done and should be discussed at the outset;
  • 64% of sellers were “very satisfied” with the process; 25% were “somewhat satisfied” and 12% were dissatisfied;
  • The overall median selling price was $259,900. Remember that this is a national number.  The median selling price for FSBOs was $200,000; for agent-assisted sales it was $264,900 and for FSBOs who eventually used an agent the median selling price was $227,900.  This clearly shows the advantage of hiring and paying a professional.

The bottom line is that this can be a very confusing process.  This NOT a retail transaction!  It is typically costly enough without making expensive mistakes.  Unless you do this regularly, I respectfully suggest that you trust a trained, experienced professional.  Whether you want to trust your most valuable asset to someone with little experience or someone who has a long track record is up to you but any professional is likely to know more than an average seller looking to save a few dollars.  I understand that signing a formal contract with someone, even if recommended to you, is quite a leap of faith.  Most of us can offer options to increase your comfort level.  After all, we want to make sure that you “fit” with us as well.

Selling Real Estate is unique compared to most typical purchases:  not only is it much less frequent than other purchases, it typically involves multiple steps, each offering its own challenges.  If you would like to discuss selling or buying or if you have any thoughts about this, please contact me.

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations! 

Remember:  HIRE WISELY!  We are not all the same!

Technology and Real Estate

Gordon Gecko might say “technology is good” but Dirty Harry Callahan would add (paraphrasing for effect) that humans have to understand its limitations!

In the 1970’s I was fascinated with Texas Instruments calculators.  They quickly went from very basic to very complicated.  Just look at a modern-day financial calculator!  Today many of us seem unable do simple math without a calculator.  In the 1980’s I was fascinated with dial-up modems and being able to send and receive email.  Then I was introduced to Lotus 1-2-3 and Symphony.  Wow!  In the 1990’s I got my first home computer.  It had a huge storage capacity of 8 megs (yes, I said megs!) and enabled me to set up a spreadsheet for a pool team I ran.  I could also word process a weekly newsletter for my team.

In 1996 I became a Real Estate agent.  The industry was evolving from what the more experienced agents call “the books” for distributing information about property listings to Internet-connected computers running on 3.5″ disks.  Until that change, property listings were collected and disseminated to offices and agents in books every couple of weeks and manually searching for listings and comparable sales was time consuming and inexact to say the least.  The data was beyond stale when received.  It was a major achievement to be able to access information about property listings online and then in our homes!  OOOH!

The Real Estate world shifted monumentally in the new century as the public was allowed to peer behind the curtain and get property listings in their homes and businesses, allowing them to bypass over a million trained agents who had controlled the data since the first cave dweller decided to relocate.  Over time, while the data was limited to active, coming soon and under contract listings, third-party web sites began using valuation models to help buyers and sellers “understand” the financial landscape better.  At least that was what they were told.  There is so much more to say about that but I want to focus on technology and how it has inserted itself into Real Estate.

Seth Godin recently blogged about the evolution of technology and he accurately describes the first three cycles, stating the we are now in the fourth.  However, at least as far as Real Estate is concerned, the fourth, while on the horizon, is far from settled.  Sure, we saw a computer beat a Grand Master in chess and win on Jeopardy BUT they have not come close to perfecting a self-driving car and the track record with predicting home values is pathetic.

So, while many of us will continue to love and embrace technology, with many being “early adopters”, I would respectfully encourage my fellow humans to engage with professionals when it comes to Real Estate.  Buying and selling is not so easily predictive as answering a question, creating a question when offered an answer or even moving chess pieces and predicting the outcome of a head-to-head chess match.  There is no doubt that computers can do a seemingly endless array of lengthy calculations faster than we can blink or access a history of information if entered and stored properly but, can computers act illogically or emotionally?  Buying and selling Real Estate are emotional decisions justified with logic.  It is one thing to provide quick access to property listings and then to try to display comparable sales history to evaluate but it is quite another to create and present a purchase offer and then negotiate what may be many steps to make sure that both parties remain committed to completing a sale.  This is not a retail transaction!

Technology certainly has its place and there is no going back in time.  The critical factor is knowing its value, its limitations and where it fits into the process.  Information and data are not the same as knowledge and insight!

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations! 

Remember:  HIRE WISELY!  We are not all the same!

How Buyers Buy Real Estate, Part 2 of 2.

Filed under: Buying,Hiring an agent,Inspections and Contingencies — awetzel @ 4:28 PM

Today I want to discuss the 2018 NAR or National Association of REALTORS Profile of Buyers and Sellers.  The report comes from a survey using 129 questions mailed to over 155,000 home buyers who purchased a primary residence between July 2017 and June 2018.  7191 were returned.  This was a national survey so your market may be quite different.  Real Estate is local:  there is no national Real Estate market so please contact me for information about your local market.

This is Part 2 of 2.  In Part 1 I focused on buyer characteristics, meaning who is the typical buyer.  In Part 2 I will focus on the process the typical buyer used to find their home, the results they achieved and how they felt about the experience.  There will be some overlap between the parts.

As I learned years ago, buying a home is an emotional decision justified with logic.  This is what can make it fun or not.  The process can be interesting enough when there is only one buyer involved.  People have different ways of making decisions and we all handle challenges and stress differently.  Buying a home typically offers plenty of both.  When more than one buyer is involved, there can be quite a negotiation between the parties and they often seek my opinion.  Purchasing a home is typically the largest financial transaction anyone will ever make and it involves many lifestyle factors.  It is a serious process.  Here are some highlights:

  • 86% purchased existing homes; 14% bought new construction;
  • Nationally, buyers typically paid 99% of the asking price;
  • 56% of buyers said that finding the “right property” was the most difficult part of the process; 24% mentioned financing (including saving for a down payment (13%) and getting a loan (8%)), 20% cited the paperwork and 16% mentioned understanding the process. And yet, buyers often avoid or delay seeking professional assistance.  Given 24/7 access to the Internet, some may find this interesting.  I am not surprised as it supports my belief that Realtors bring value to the process of buying Real Estate above and beyond simply providing houses to look at.  While that is obviously important, buyers need to arrange financing and determine what they want and need in a house so that they can evaluate their options and make the best choice for themselves, keeping in mind that they may have serious competition.  Some houses sell quickly.  Buying a home takes time and effort.  For example, I have worked with many buyers during my career and have been able to identify houses for them to consider that they did not or could not find on their own.  My experience working with sellers, especially those whose properties other agents could not sell, has taught me a great deal about marketing homes to ensure that they appear in buyer’s search results.  Think “Google search”.  This knowledge helps me with buyers.  I will be happy to explain this in detail;
  • 88% financed their purchase, typically financing 87% of the price with first-timers financing 93% and repeat buyers financing 84%;
  • 9% found the mortgage application process to be much more difficult than expected with only a 1% difference between first-time and repeat buyers. This explains why so many wait to do this, perhaps to their detriment.  Sellers tend to focus on three parts of any agreement:  the amount of the offer, the buyer’s financing and the terms and conditions of the offer.  Sellers want to avoid or minimize the risk of a failed sale;
  • 13% reported that saving for a down payment was the most difficult step with 50% of those citing student loans. This is a problem that has been well reported.  It delays many aspects of life;
  • 50% of buyers found the home they purchased online; 28% through an agent; 7% from a “For Sale” or an open house sign. There is no doubt that the Internet has displaced agents as a valuable source of property listings.  No one can or should dispute that.  However, it has clearly NOT displaced the need for us to assist with the numerous tasks that are necessary to buying a house regardless of where or how it was identified.  One final point here is that it is important that a buyer provide accurate information as far as what is important for them.  Having a buyer search online for one set of criteria while their buyer-agent searches for something different can and will cause problems.  We should be finding the same possibilities!  Communication is critical;
  • 92% were “satisfied” with the process but only 62% reported being “very satisfied” and 8% were very dissatisfied. Buying a house or investment property can be very frustrating.  Trying to justify the emotion of a home purchase with logic can be a challenge.  I have met a number of owners who told me that they made a mistake when they bought their home; some realized that sooner than others.  While their situations may have varied, this often meant that they would have some difficulty selling or achieving what they wanted or needed to make a move.  I can share some stories;
  • 26% were given agency disclosures at the initial meeting. In PA you may know this as the Consumer Notice form that we are required to use.  The purpose of this disclosure is to offer a buyer choices as far as how we are to work together.  Historically many buyers assumed we were representing “their best interests” even though they had not formally committed to using our services.  Prior to buyer agency all agents worked for the seller’s best interests!  23% only received the required disclosure when their offer was being  written; 11% received it some other time.  The good news is that 60% received it, even if late.  23% say they never received it and 18% said they did not know.  In addition to being a REALTOR and Associate Broker, I am a Mediator and have spent years working on our Professional Standards Committee.  In those roles I have been involved in many situations where the consumer, meaning a buyer or seller, had quite a different perception of their relationship with an agent than their agent had.  Trust me when I tell you that this can cause problems;
  • Continuing with that thought, 40% said they had a written representation agreement with their agent; 16% said it was oral; 31% had no agreement and 14% did not know;
  • Buyers ranked a number of agent qualities: 97% want honesty and integrity; 94% want them to be knowledgeable; 92% want them to be responsive; 84% want them to be able to negotiate;
  • The top three benefits Real Estate agents provided were: 60% said helping buyers understand the process, 57% said pointing out features or faults with properties and others said negotiating better terms.

Buying Real Estate is a unique purchase:  not only is it much less frequent than other purchases, it typically involves multiple steps, each offering their own challenges.  If you would like to discuss buying or selling or if you have any thoughts about this, please contact me.

Please look for Part 1.

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectation!

 Remember:  HIRE WISELY!  We are not all the same.

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