Andrew Wetzel's Musings

November 2, 2019

Bright MLS Listing Statuses and What They Mean

There are two primary tools used for conveying property information for buying and selling Real Estate.  While there are literally hundreds of possible ways to communicate this information, except for specific market segments which may use or need a different approach, all but the top two pale in comparison as far as efficiency and effectiveness.  Real Estate agents are the “match makers” bringing sellers and buyers together:  we participate in over 91% of Real Estate transactions.

By efficiency I mean having the ability to mass market information as quickly as possible.  Marketing means exposure and exposure should ensure that a seller achieve the highest possible selling price in a reasonable amount of time.  Whether the value the market attaches to a property meets the seller’s expectations or not is another story.  The fact is that Real Estate needs to be exposed to the mass market, properties have to be available to be shown to prospective buyers and sellers need to believe that the value they are offered has not been negatively impacted by poor or limited exposure.  Sellers are either motivated by time or money so some may be willing to settle for less if they sell quickly.

By effective I mean that prospective buyers and their agents must be able to readily identify all of the options which meet the buyer’s wants and needs.  Buyers need to be able to believe that they are getting the best value for their dollar by being able to compare what is available for purchase and to compare what is available with what has been sold as far as location, features, condition and price.  The concept of “data integrity” means that information is uploaded accurately so that it can be identified by people searching for it.  Of course, listing agents and mortgage appraisers need to rely on the information as well.  No one benefits from inefficient or ineffective means of conveying Real Estate information.

So, what are the two tools?  They are the multiple listing service and the Internet.  Agents use the MLS to research the market, to offer their listings to the masses and to attach a “range of values” to what they are hired to sell as listing or buying agents.  While often not a direct link, generally what is uploaded to the MLS is “syndicated” to the third-party public-facing websites on the Internet.  While information can be placed on the Internet beyond what the MLS offers or without any placement in the MLS, the Internet has its own limitations.  For example, while it provides lots of data and information, it is a static medium which cannot provide the knowledge and insight an agent can.  It also cannot provide up-to-the-minute access to property listings or information about recently settled properties.  As an example, most people understand that the “valuation” models provided by Internet sites are unreliable even if they do not know that the lack of real-time information is a major reason for that.

My point is not to compare the two media although there are significant differences.  The public should not assume that they can “shop online” for property and Real Estate information, delay contacting an experienced, trained, educated and knowledgeable professional and still expect the best possible outcome.  Buying and selling Real Estate are too important and too many are ill-equipped for the process and the decisions that typically will follow.  Both media, while different, need to rely on “data integrity”, meaning that anyone who finds “information” on either platform should be able to trust that it is valid and that is the problem.

One major point of focus is the “listing status” of the property so I will discuss the different MLS statuses and give a brief description.  It has been my experience that some agents and many consumers do not clearly understand what these terms mean.  Misinformation can be costly given that the sale or purchase of Real Estate is typically the most expensive financial transaction a consumer will make.  The cost of mistakes can be high with little chance to recover lost opportunity.  Now, the statuses.

Active:  means that a property is available for showings and for purchase.  This seems simple enough but Bright has a 3-business day rule meaning that status changes, including price changes, must be reported within 3 business days with the date of the “change” counting as day #1.  Good agents will verify the listing status before showing a property or writing an offer.  Failure to comply with the rule may violate rules and regulations;

Active Under Contract:  means that there is an executed purchase agreement but the property is still available for showings.  The real question is why?  Does the seller have the right to terminate the existing contract or are they just looking for “back-up” offers in case something happens?  Whichever is the case should be obvious.  Good agents will ask questions.  The key point here is that showings must be allowed;

Canceled:  means that the listing contract has been canceled;

Closed:  also called “settled”, means that the sale or lease has been finalized;

Coming Soon:  means that the property is not available for showings but listing agents must respond to inquiries whether the property is the MLS or not.  This is a current “hot topic” which is still evolving;

Expired:  means that the listing contract term has run out without a sale;

Temporarily Off Market:  means that showings have been stopped and will resume at some point.  There are no showings but offers can be submitted;

Pending:  means that the property is “under contract” or sold but not settled.  No further showings will be scheduled;

Withdrawn:  means that the marketing has stopped but the listing contract still binds the seller to the listing broker.  The seller may still be interested in receiving offers but there are now showings.

Agents and the public must understand what the different statuses mean and agents must use them properly.  Few things frustrate a prospective buyer more than feeling that they are being excluded from a property especially if they think that the listing agent is the cause.  Our REALTOR Code of Ethics requires that we protect and promote the interests of our client and be honest with the public.  Failure to do either can and has hurt how we are perceived.  Sellers and buyers should feel comfortable asking questions about the process and deserve to be given honest and complete answers.

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations!

 HIRE WISELY:  We are not all the same!

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