Andrew Wetzel's Musings

March 25, 2019

Technology and Real Estate

Gordon Gecko might say “technology is good” but Dirty Harry Callahan would add (paraphrasing for effect) that humans have to understand its limitations!

In the 1970’s I was fascinated with Texas Instruments calculators.  They quickly went from very basic to very complicated.  Just look at a modern-day financial calculator!  Today many of us seem unable do simple math without a calculator.  In the 1980’s I was fascinated with dial-up modems and being able to send and receive email.  Then I was introduced to Lotus 1-2-3 and Symphony.  Wow!  In the 1990’s I got my first home computer.  It had a huge storage capacity of 8 megs (yes, I said megs!) and enabled me to set up a spreadsheet for a pool team I ran.  I could also word process a weekly newsletter for my team.

In 1996 I became a Real Estate agent.  The industry was evolving from what the more experienced agents call “the books” for distributing information about property listings to Internet-connected computers running on 3.5″ disks.  Until that change, property listings were collected and disseminated to offices and agents in books every couple of weeks and manually searching for listings and comparable sales was time consuming and inexact to say the least.  The data was beyond stale when received.  It was a major achievement to be able to access information about property listings online and then in our homes!  OOOH!

The Real Estate world shifted monumentally in the new century as the public was allowed to peer behind the curtain and get property listings in their homes and businesses, allowing them to bypass over a million trained agents who had controlled the data since the first cave dweller decided to relocate.  Over time, while the data was limited to active, coming soon and under contract listings, third-party web sites began using valuation models to help buyers and sellers “understand” the financial landscape better.  At least that was what they were told.  There is so much more to say about that but I want to focus on technology and how it has inserted itself into Real Estate.

Seth Godin recently blogged about the evolution of technology and he accurately describes the first three cycles, stating the we are now in the fourth.  However, at least as far as Real Estate is concerned, the fourth, while on the horizon, is far from settled.  Sure, we saw a computer beat a Grand Master in chess and win on Jeopardy BUT they have not come close to perfecting a self-driving car and the track record with predicting home values is pathetic.

So, while many of us will continue to love and embrace technology, with many being “early adopters”, I would respectfully encourage my fellow humans to engage with professionals when it comes to Real Estate.  Buying and selling is not so easily predictive as answering a question, creating a question when offered an answer or even moving chess pieces and predicting the outcome of a head-to-head chess match.  There is no doubt that computers can do a seemingly endless array of lengthy calculations faster than we can blink or access a history of information if entered and stored properly but, can computers act illogically or emotionally?  Buying and selling Real Estate are emotional decisions justified with logic.  It is one thing to provide quick access to property listings and then to try to display comparable sales history to evaluate but it is quite another to create and present a purchase offer and then negotiate what may be many steps to make sure that both parties remain committed to completing a sale.  This is not a retail transaction!

Technology certainly has its place and there is no going back in time.  The critical factor is knowing its value, its limitations and where it fits into the process.  Information and data are not the same as knowledge and insight!

There is no time for inexperience, empty promises or false expectations! 

Remember:  HIRE WISELY!  We are not all the same!

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